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Movie Review: Kyaa Super Kool Hain Hum

Mayank Shekhar   |  Jul 27, 2012, 14:23PM IST
Genre: Comedy
Director: Sachin Yardi
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Plot: Clumsy, yes. Cool? Not sure...

Random guy: Couldn't hear your name, I am sorry.
Sid: Hi, Sorry. I’m Sid.
Random guy: You're so witty.
Sid: You're so Churchgate.


I have sampled you a mini-joke from this film that’s “vegetarian” enough for family consumption. Juts so you get an idea of the level of humour we’re dealing with here. Sid’s (Riteish Deshmukh) of course the film’s hero. VT (or Witty) and Churchgate are popular stations in Mumbai. The “random guy” is gay. Most jokes concern either Sid or his best-friend Adi (Tusshar Kapoor) being gay as well. If not, the gags are centred on their two love-interests being lesbians. If you can take this sort of comedy non-stop for two hours and 16 minutes, with a few music videos and a really good song (“Shirt Da Button”) slipped in without any context, then this is just the movie for you.

Else, maybe you could satisfy yourself reading this tale of agony instead. Sid’s a DJ who gets no gigs. Adi’s an actor whose talents usually get showcased on ads for constipation pills. They’re obviously going through rough times. Sid contemplates buying a packet of sanitary napkins, since he’s going through such a “bad period”. Adi takes advice from a tarot card reader, who says a woman with the name starting with “S” could change his life. The hero in Sangeeth Sivan's Kya Kool Hai Hum (2005), of which this film is supposedly a sequel, had to similarly discover a girl with a mole on her right breast to being good luck. Adi finds the woman with "S", proposes marriage to her, presents her an expensive diamond ring, but she turns him down. The ring is still with her. She is in Goa. The two buddies Adi, Sid go off to Goa looking for that ring.

You’d imagine that’s the story. It’s not. The question of the ring – the central plot – never occurs thereafter. What does? Well, mostly references to recent Bollywood hits, including that refrain “Aaye” from Housefull 2; that really old joke, the Devdas song “Dildo La Re” as reference to the plight of lesbians; and a horny dog who is a canine equivalent of the virile Vicky Donor.


All the humour is in the lines. The dialogue writer of this film is a decent chutkula writer, suited best for stand-up comedies or hasya kavitas. You know at some point the jokes will dry up. They’ll start exhausting you with their only meaning; let alone the double meaning. The film will lose energy too, given there wasn’t much of a plot to keep it going for this long.


To be fair, the producers had already advertised this film in posters as being bakwaas in the eyes of critics, who are after all no different from regular audiences. They don’t disappoint you on that front at all. You hope at least the front-benchers will be happy. They’d loved this movie’s first part.

 
 

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