Home»Delhi» Jahan-e-khusrau 2013: Malini Awasthi’s voice, Astha’s beauty enthrall Delhi’s Sufis

Jahan-e-Khusrau: 'The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved'

Vaibhav Tiwari | Last Modified - Mar 02, 2013, 10:47 PM IST

Jahan-e-Khusrau: 'The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved'
  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

  • +16 See more slides

    New Delhi: “I am a pagan (worshiper) of love: the creed (of Muslims) I do not need;

    Every vein of mine has become taut like a wire; the (Hindu) girdle I do not need.

    Leave from my bedside, you ignorant physician!

    The only cure for the patient of love is the sight of his beloved –

    other than this no medicine does he need.

    If there be no pilot on our ship, let there be none:

    We have God in our midst: the pilot we do not need.

    The people of the world say that Khusrau worships idols.

    So I do, so I do; the people I do not need,

    the world I do not need.”

    Nearly 800 years after Hazrat Amir Khusrau, these lines written by him still inspire the people to embrace and love every religion. His appeal to surrender to the god still resounds in his poems, songs. In the time when politics divide Hindus and Muslims, Hazrat sahab’s Sufism seems to be the trying it heart out to bridge the divide. His creations seem to be epitomizing country’s unique unity and diversity tradition. His writing, his music makes us remember our glorious past that fostered civilisations from across the world and made them one of our own. That past shows us that peace, tranquility and tolerance is the future human race should strive for. One of the first Sufis Khusrau sahab is still relevant, still living amongst us. His soul could be felt in any Sufi’s aalap. He was felt on Friday night, in Jahan-e-Sufi festival at Arab ki Sarai, Humayun Tomb.

    The 13th Jahan-e-Khusrau festival’s first day was marked by famous semi-classical singer Malini Awasthi, who is a regular at the 3-day amalgamation of world’s Sufism. Her ‘taans’ were well complimented by gorgeous Kathak dancer Astha Dixit. The audience was rendered helpless; on one hand it wanted to close the eyes to savour the deep melodies, on other Astha’s grace on the stage didn’t let them blink. Baring the night chills at historical remains of Arab ki Sarai at Humayun Tomb, the Sufi lovers found warmth of love in Malini’s voice and Astha’s beauty and finesse. Later, Warsi brothers of Hyderabad gave a musical ode to the father of Qaqawaalis Hazrat Amir Khusrau.

Stories You May be Interested in

More From Delhi

Trending Now

Trending

Top