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8 Countries Where Female Genital Mutilation (or Khatna) is What Childhood Memories are Made of

Priyambada Dubey | Last Modified - Sep 09, 2016, 07:40 PM IST

Nobody talks about the psychological trauma little girls go through after the procedure.
  • Representational image
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    Representational image
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • SUDAN
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    SUDAN
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • BURKINA FASO
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    BURKINA FASO
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • CHAD
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    CHAD
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • DJIBOUTI
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    DJIBOUTI
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • ERITREA
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    ERITREA
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • MALI
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    MALI
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • SOMALIA
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    SOMALIA
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.
  • FRENCH GUIANA
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    FRENCH GUIANA
    As soon as she reaches puberty, an elder member of the community slices off parts of her clitoris and labia. Why? To preserve her ‘sexual honour’ or because ‘men cannot control their sexual desires’. Welcome to reality!
    Practiced extensively in parts of Africa and Middle East, female genital mutilation (FGM) or khatna has become a rite we are scared to question, forget about abolishing. You cannot get married and obviously cannot have children unless you have had a partial or full removal of your external sex organs when you were still a little girl. Let us not talk about the trauma the young lives have to go through.
    Is it time to discard the brutal tradition? Definitely yes. Not getting circumcised is nothing about blasphemy; in fact it is a violation of human rights. It causes urinary infections, menstrual problems and can even lead to death, not to mention the psychological trauma.
    Several countries, where FGM was legal, have now taken historic steps to outlaw the practice. This includes Central African Republic, Nigeria as well as Egypt among several others. When these countries can, so can the rest of the world. It is time to break the taboo around the subject, talk openly about it and let our girls live a free life.
    In the next slides have a look at the countries where the tradition is still practised.

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